Services

Ultrasound

Ultrasound uses sound waves to create images that represent slices through the body. No radiation is used in ultrasound imaging. The sound waves used are not of the pitch or frequency that humans can hear. The sound waves are generated by the ultrasound machine and are sent into the body by a transducer. The sound is then reflected, like an echo. The echo returns to the transducer and is converted into an image.

What preparation is needed?

Please report to the Imaging Department on the first floor 15 minutes prior to your appointment.

Vascular/Venous Doppler/Carotid Doppler/Arterial Doppler:
No special preparation is needed.

Breast:
No special preparation is needed.

Abdomen (gallbladder, pancreas, liver, spleen, other abdominal organ):
Do not eat for six to eight hours prior to the examination. If instructed by your physician, take your medicines before the procedure. You may bring your medicines with you to take when the examination is completed.

Kidneys:
Do not eat for six to eight hours prior to the examination. Drink 24 ounces of fluid 1 hour prior to your appointment time. If instructed by your physician, take your medicines before the procedure. You may bring your medicines with you to take when the examination is completed.

Pelvis/Early Pregnancy:
It is important that you have a full bladder for the examination. This is accomplished by drinking four to six full glasses of water about an hour before the exam. A full bladder will enhance the sound wave transmission and provide a clear window for viewing of pelvic organs.

Pregnancy:
No special preparation is needed.

 

Who performs the exam?

The ultrasound will be performed by a registered diagnostic medical sonographer certified in sonography procedures.

What will happen during the examination?

  • Please allow 30-60 minutes for an ultrasound exam.
  • Depending on the body part being imaged, you may be asked to change into a gown.
  • The ultrasound technologist will ask you to lie on your back on an examining table. The technologist may have you change positions during the exam. The technologist may have you hold your breath for some of the images. If a vascular exam is being performed, the technologist will listen to the blood flow through your blood vessel.
  • For pelvic/early pregnancy exams, imaging is performed over your lower abdomen and transvaginally. For the transvaginal portion, the transducer is covered, lubricated, and inserted into the vagina, to take additional images. The transducer is smaller than most speculums used for a vaginal exam, but may feel similar.
     

What about the results?

Once the study is completed, the images are studied and interpreted by a radiologist. A report will be available for your physician.

If you have questions, please call the Ultrasound Department, 217-245-9541, ext. 3917.